sabotabby: (sabokitty)
>made it to the Women's March for about 45 minutes yesterday. Turns out I wasn't needed because there was such a phenomenally huge crowd—60,000, by best estimates, which is far more than the lawn and surrounding roads outside of Queen's Park could hold. I tried to take photos, but there were so many people that this was practically impossible.


here are my attempts )

I was pretty glad I got to go and be a part of this moment in history, even if it was just for a few minutes. I've been essentially away all weekend, but I've been passively enjoying looking at everyone's pictures, from all over the world, suggesting a nascent movement to resist misogyny, racism, and fascism.
sabotabby: raccoon anarchy symbol (fuck patriarchy)
Hopefully a continuing series where I criticize the left, but from a place of love. You know, if people are interested in that kind of thing.

Today is the National Day of Remembrance and Action on Violence Against Women. That's something I wholeheartedly support, being an unapologetic man-eating feminist myself. But like many good ideas that are too good for the moderates to fully ignore, it's quite often watered-down and turned into the merely symbolic, especially in public institutions like schools or quasi-public spaces like Facebook.

Dec. 6th is the anniversary of the massacre at l'École Polytechnique de Montréal. Fourteen young women were murdered at the hands of a maniac, simply for the audacity for being female engineering students. In a country where mass shootings really don't happen often, it was shocking and horrific and leaves a deep psychological scar on any of us who remember, vividly, hearing the news.

Dec. 6th is a day for ritual now. Any well-meaning person of any gender dons the white ribbon (even though the original point was for men to show that they were against violence against women*). Schoolchildren make handprints on banners that declare, "these hands will never be used in violence," even though that is statistically unlikely to be the case. Posters go up, most with roses on them.

On Facebook, every other post is a list of the names of the dead, now with the requisite likes and hearts and crying faces and sometimes angry faces (from the leftists).

It's not that I don't think that these are all important rituals to have, or that these 14 women are not worth remembering. They absolutely are. But I'm uncomfortable when something I feel passionate about is reduced to a cut-and-paste of names and ages so that everyone can show how they remember, how important the ritual is, and how very not-sexist they are. It becomes an exercise in form over function.

Violence against women in Canada does not, by and large, look like a lunatic carefully sorting the female students from the male students and then gunning down the former. That has happened, but that is not what usually happens. Women are more likely to face violence at the hands of a loved one than a stranger. The dead are less likely to look like photogenic young students and more likely to look like this:

15317735_10210195526377609_9006564611569533908_n

Oh, you probably can't see that too well. That's the 1181 missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls in Canada between 1980-2012, who rarely get spoken about on the one day that we get to talk about violence against women. Marc Lépine is dead, and beyond the reach of justice, but there still might be justice for the women pictured above. We won't know if we don't do anything about it.

It's not a day to talk about the women and girls in prison and foster care, or even victims of domestic violence. Not sex workers or trans women or non-status immigrants, who face a greater risk of violence and exploitation than the general population.  It's not a day to talk about women who have been raped by men who are deemed more trustworthy than they are, and thus are re-victimized in the press and the courts. If we took today to look at those things, we might look at violence against women as something other than a horrible event that happened once but is now safely in the past to be ritualized. We would have to see it as something ongoing, something in which all genders are complicit.

It's not a day to talk about misogyny, today, as rampant and widespread as ever, to shut down any number of MRA and Alt-Reich groups who have seized the zeigeist by the pussy. That would be politicizing things, and the National Day of Remembrance and Action is a hashtag, not, like, a political thing.

My beef is institutional, not individual. On a personal level, listing the names of the 14 victims of Dec. 6th is understandable, even laudable. On an institutional level, however, framing violence against women as a rare, dramatic act rather than a routine and persistent symptom of a patriarchal culture is not productive. I'm not going to lie and tell you I have an answer to this, or even that I know with certainty that it's a problem, per se. I guess I just want a louder, angrier, more complicated discussion. Not symbols, and not copy-and-paste. Ugly, unvarnished truth that moves towards action. For starters.


* Gender is, of course, more complicated, but a lot of us didn't know that in 1991 when Jack Layton was first promoting it.
sabotabby: raccoon anarchy symbol (fuck patriarchy)
I just had a bunch of surprisingly productive discussions around feminism and harassment, spurred by the stupid verdict in the case of Gregory Alan Elliott, the latest Tropes vs. Women video, and the overall imbalance in what we mean when we talk about freedom of speech.

Both of these cases have a lot to do with how the law is unwilling (I almost typed "unable," but this isn't true—they're perfectly capable of understanding Twitter threats against cops) to take into account both gender dynamics and internet culture. Elliott was acquitted (and may go on to sue his victims) because they didn't act like perfect victims. Why, one might ask—and the judge did—would they block him and continue to respond to his tweets?

This is a fundamental misunderstanding of how these things work. I know, because I've had stalkers and trolls. There is no perfect way to engage with them. Your mother might have said, "ignore the bully and he'll go away," but you knew even as a child that this wasn't true.

Internet discussion is largely public. This means that if I am telling the truth and Igor the Troll is telling a lie, our discussion is witnessed by outsiders. A typical exchange might go something like this:

Igor: Obvious falsehood nevertheless believed by those who have an interest in maintaining the status quo.
Sabs: Bunch of facts in rebuttal.
Igor: Shut up you cunt bitch ill rape your eyesocket.

(If you think I'm exaggerating, you're naïve af. This is mild by comparison to some of the things I've seen.)

Now, a logical judge, not taking gender or power into account, is going to think, "well, she can block him, why doesn't she just block him?" But Igor is not going to shut up. And to an audience—because this is the internet, and there is always an audience—if I shut up, Igor looks like the winner.

This is something that just won't make sense unless you spend a lot of time around kids, which I do. If you show kids a political debate and ask them who won, the kids will not identify the person who said the most accurate facts. They will identify the person who was the loudest and who, preferably, spouted the most insults. The primary reason, I'd argue, why Trump is popular is because most Americans haven't progressed past the developmental stage that my kids are in.

So my choosing to block and ignore may be, to me (and the judge) a sensible move of self-preservation, to Igor the Troll, and everyone watching, it looks like he won. Now, I can choose to ignore this, and I probably would, but it will be galling. It will sit under my skin. Igor the Troll will not stop talking because I've stopped talking. He may go on to talk about me, to spread rumours and lies, and he's less likely to be challenged because sensible people don't bother.

I fully understand why Guthrie and Reilly wouldn't, in this circumstance, act like perfect victims and just ignore the scum harassing them. Why should they? Why does Elliott get freedom of speech and they do not? Why is it always down to the woman to run away, to withdraw, to not go out at that time of night wearing that skirt?

Anyway, one dude messaged me and said he didn't get feminists. Did we want equality or supremacy? He compared feminism to vegans, and how there are some vegans who just are, and some vegans who reminded you that they were vegan every five minutes.

I used to draw this distinction too, before I saw what was happening to a vegan friend of mine on Tumblr. She'd post a vegan recipe and immediately get anon hate. Was it any wonder that rather than be intimidated into silence, she'd get louder in response? That got me thinking to just how often omnivores remind us that they're omnivores—bacon memes, posting jokes about vegetarians murdering carrots—but this stridency is entirely invisible, because most people are omnivores. Vegans are perceived as more obnoxious about their dietary choices not because they are (I'm firmly convinced they're not) but because it's Other, and thus marked as a political statement, while eating meat is neutral and unmarked.

Dude admitted he was afraid of women, so I unpacked that. It's the old Margaret Atwood quote: "Men are afraid women will laugh at them; women are afraid men will kill them." We went back and forth for about 45 minutes, at the end of which I think he got it a bit more.

I had a similar conversation with another young man who'd posted a "political correctness has gone too far; you can't say anything without being called a racist or a sexist, FREEZED PEACH"-type rant. Now, it's probably not a secret that I don't believe in freedom of speech—as in I don't believe that it exists, period, or can exist—but I questioned him on his consistency. Did he believe, for example, that ISIS sympathizers on Twitter should have free speech? Was he vigorously defending their rights to say what they liked? Of course, he wasn't, so I walked him through his own flawed assumptions about what was violent and what was peaceful. I don't think he agreed with me by the end—I wouldn't expect him to, as he's not the sharpest chisel in the toolbox—but he remained remarkably civil throughout and thanked me.

I don't always have the time or patience to educate people about power dynamics or feminism or anti-racism, and I tend towards the hairtrigger emotional at the best of times, but I'm kinda pleased with how these various discussions went. I mean, it stresses me out that we still gotta fight these stupid battles, but what else can you do?
sabotabby: raccoon anarchy symbol (Jenny Sparks)
Here is a thing I didn't know about:



These lovely ladies are Night Witches, female military aviators of the 588th Night Bomber Regiment, who flew harassment bombing campaigns for the Soviets during WWII. We don't learn about them in history class for some reason. I blame the patriarchy. They flew utterly obsolete airplanes that made huge amounts of noise and nevertheless managed to kick serious Nazi ass. Their leader flew over 200 missions and was never captured.

Here is some more information from a website with horrible typography. And here is a Telegraph article focusing on Lilia Litvyak, who flew under the call sign White Lily and needed a cushion to see out of the windshield. I'm bookmarking this BBC segment for later. Bitch has an excellent article about them as well. From former pilot, Dr. Galina Beltsova:

"We slept in anything we could find—holes in the ground, tents, caves—but the Germans had to have their barracks, you know. They are very precise. So their barracks were built, all in a neat row, and we would come at night, after they were asleep, and bomb them. Of course, they would have to run out into the night in their underwear, and they were probably saying,—Oh, those night witches!' Or maybe they called us something worse. We, of course, would have preferred to have been called 'night beauties,' but, whichever, we did our job."


Oh, and Garth Ennis wrote a comic about them. How is that not in my eyeballs right now?

More pictures! )
sabotabby: raccoon anarchy symbol (abortion)
Via [livejournal.com profile] fengi"

I’m beginning to get some evidence from certain doctors and certain scientists that have done research on women’s wombs after they’ve gone through the surgery, and they’ve compared the wombs of women who were on the birth control pill to those who were not on the birth control pill. And they have found that with women who are on the birth control pill, there are these little tiny fetuses, these little babies, that are embedded into the womb. They’re just like dead babies. They’re on the inside of the womb. And these wombs of women who have been on the birth control pill effectively have become graveyards for lots and lots of little babies.

-Kevin Swanson, host of "the world’s largest homeschooling and Biblical worldview radio program". Source


In case you need a visual, here is a needlessly morbid self-portrait drawn after six years or so of being on the birth control pill:

fetal graveyard photo fetalgraveyard_zps7feb19e2.jpg
sabotabby: raccoon anarchy symbol (fuck patriarchy)
I have dinner at this Chinese kiosk in a shopping plaza so frequently that they know to get the hot sauce and chopsticks when they see me coming. It happens to be right near my doctor's office, and for mall food it's really good (they make a mean homestyle tofu), plus the place has a big screen TV that always plays the news, so it's where I unwind and hang out for a bit before my appointment. It's usually pretty busy there, with a mix of shoppers, commuters, and dudes from a nearby homeless shelter, and eating my takeout while raging at the news has become part of my weekly routine. Occasionally, some of the more inebriated homeless dudes will cause a ruckus, but I've never felt it was in any way a less than totally safe space.

Until tonight.

Exciting stories of teh patriarchy )

IWD

Mar. 8th, 2012 07:36 pm
sabotabby: raccoon anarchy symbol (fuck patriarchy)
I was too busy drowning in work and health miseries to do anything exciting to commemorate International Women's Day.

It seems a bit disingenuous to even make a "happy IWD everyone!" post. After all, we live in a world where the puppet government that we murdered countless Afghans to install flat-out stated that it considers women "secondary," Virginia mandates invasive and unnecessary medical procedures for women who need abortions, and Rush Limbaugh exists. Not a ton to celebrate—better steel ourselves for the battles ahead.

On a more trivial but related note, I'm planning to re-print my Rebel Girl design. Anyone interested in getting some printed up?
sabotabby: raccoon anarchy symbol (fuck patriarchy)
Oh, is Michfest doing its transphobic routine again? It is?

Copypasta'd from my comment in a locked post:

Womon?!

I mean, there is a metric fuck-ton of stupidity in practically everything out of Michfest's collective mouths these days, but for some reason, bizarre spelling contortions because one is so EDGY never fail to get an eyeroll out of me. Making up words or terms that everyone outside of your little circle either won't get or will laugh at does not make you a more hardcore feminist. It makes you look like a bunch of moronic children who stapled a sign to their treehouse reading "NO TRANS PEEPLE ALOWED."

Go up to any woman, cis or trans, outside of Michfest's corner, and tell them about WBW. You'll get blank looks.

Low-hanging fruit aside, is there any space where trans people can feel wanted without a fight? I mean, my house, I guess. Otherwise, it's pretty much guaranteed that you will have to fight your way in, just like all queer folks have had to fight their way in, like all feminists have had to fight their way in, like every racialized and marginalized group has had to go where some shitheel has told them they don't belong.


I almost wish that I liked earnest folk music and being naked in the mud so that I could boycott this gender essentialist ridiculousness.


While we're on the topic of gender essentialism, interview with the Beer for the Ladiez woman. I still can't get over how funny I find it. It's pink! The logo appears to be Curlz MT typeface. There's a purse and a little black dress on it. Because women like that sort of thing. Did I mention that it's pink? And it is diet and makes you burp less than other beers. I wonder if the proceeds benefit "breast cancer awareness," too.
sabotabby: raccoon anarchy symbol (socialism with a human face)
Check out this clusterfuck of racism and ableism: Family faces deportation over son's autism. You can be a good and productive citizen all you want, but if your kid has a disability, apparently you're just not welcome in Canada. The good news is this: Protest sometimes actually works. Because public protest made Jason Kenney back down. Awesome.

Here's another issue near and dear to my heart: school surveillance. That article is from the Guardian, citing examples from the U.S., where students must walk through metal detectors and cops are omnipresent, handcuffing and tasering small children, but don't think that Canada is all that far behind. Schools are where the next generation is being trained to accept routine violations of their bodies and their privacy.

Expect to be hearing about my union's campaign to keep the Tories out in the Ontario election. As might be expected, the SUN article contains some inaccuracies and lacks quotes from the vast majority of teachers who would rather not be pink-slipped by a Hudak government.

Here's another fun one from Cracked: The 5 Most Pointlessly Women-Specific Products. I'm a bad feminist because my immediate reaction was "OMG THEY MADE A PRINCESS DI GUN?" Not that I'd ever buy one; I'm Canadian and a small-r republican. Put a Hello Kitty on one and I'm admittedly a bit tempted.

In other news, this guy is a massive douche.

And on a completely unrelated note, the antibiotics appear to be working. I'm still tired as all hell but I can actually speak and breathe properly again, so yay!
sabotabby: raccoon anarchy symbol (go fuck yourself)
Can anyone tell me what the point of issuing a trigger warning without a jump-cut might be?

I admit that this may be a failure to understand netiquette on my part, but it seems to me that if one's intent is to create a safe space for survivors of violence (and particularly survivors of sexual violence) and otherwise marginalized people, placing a trigger warning directly above the rest of a post makes no sense.

I'm increasingly seeing posts like this:

This blog post is about clowns
[TW for clowns]

So I saw a clown the other day. He had wandered off from the rest of the circus, and was sitting in an unmarked white van, just kind of leering at passersby. I was really freaked out. Who lets clowns leave the circus unsupervised these days, anyway?


Does putting the trigger warning there actually do anything to deter a reaction on the part of someone who, say, has clown-related PTSD? Methinks if your reaction to reading about triggers is so severe that you need a trigger warning, placing the article directly below probably isn't the greatest idea.

I can see something like this:

This post is about things that crawl and have too many legs
[TW for spiders]

Read more )


That way, if someone is triggered by spiders, they can avoid the post altogether and read the one about clowns instead. But no one off LJ seems to do this. On the serious feminist blogs, all of the triggery posts are uncut.

Of course, I don't do trigger warnings at all, so maybe I'm missing something here. Anyone care to enlighten me?

SlutWalk!

Apr. 3rd, 2011 05:48 pm
sabotabby: raccoon anarchy symbol (march)
I imagine that some of you would like to see SlutWalk photos.

Toronto is pretty cool sometimes, and here's why: A member of our corrupt and rancid police department remarked that I’ve been told I’m not supposed to say this, however, women should avoid dressing like sluts in order not to be victimized. This, at York University, where rape is tragically common. In response four women organized a massive demonstration to stick it to the cops, the city, and the patriarchy.

slutwalk

more under here )
sabotabby: raccoon anarchy symbol (hug an activist)
Outwitting History: The Amazing Adventures of A Man Who Rescued A Million Yiddish Books, Aaron Lansky

"M'tor nisht myaesh zayn (You must never despair). It says in Perek,: 'Loy alekho hamelokhe ligmor... It is not up to you to complete the task, but neither are you free to desist from it.'"

We all know that I am a softie at heart who cries at sad movies. It's rare that I cry while reading trade non-fiction, though. Outwitting History is a short read, but took me around a week to finish because I had to keep putting it down to reach for the Kleenex. I'm not even exaggerating.

Lansky studied Yiddish as a grad student, and came to discover that thousands—indeed, over a million—Yiddish books were at risk of being destroyed as their original owners died. He embarked on an odd sort of quest to rescue the books—and along with them, the remnants of Yiddish language and culture—from oblivion.

The writing is engaging, luminous in passages, full of wit and sorrow and the burden of history. Lansky and the people he encounters—idealistic students and aging immigrants alike—are compelling, memorable characters. But above all, this is the story of the death of a culture, and since it's my culture, I took it very personally. Lansky doesn't idealize it—in one heartbreaking section, he talks about the remaining Yiddish organizations, almost all of which were socialist or Communist, and how they refused to cooperate even to save their own resources and spaces. Nevertheless, he brings to life a lost era of refugees, Bundists, activists, writers, and poets, and makes you feel their loss with razor-sharp precision.

The good news is that the Yiddish Book Center does exist, and continues to digitize and translate its large collection. This somewhat mitigates the pain of reading about people who could be my grandparents or great-grandparents sobbing as they surrendered their precious book collections, the "portable homeland" that was frequently the only thing of value they had ever owned.

Related, I also saw:

Graphic Details: Confessional Comics by Jewish Women, currently showing at the Gladstone.

This exhibition consists of four rooms, showcasing comics on themes of sex, family, culture, politics, and the body. Primarily black-and-white, underground-style, and brutally honest, these are frequently hilarious reads. (My favourite, by Sharon Rudahl, was called "How I Got Purged From My Women's Group," and is a must-read for strident feminist types.)

how i got purged from my women's group

Speaking of awesome feminists, [livejournal.com profile] monster_grrrl, her roommate L., and I caught:

Rasputina (with Ariel) at Lee's Palace

I first saw Rasputina years ago, opening for—someone. It's a testament to how good they are that I honestly can't remember who it was I'd actually gone to see.

They're still that good. Better, even. There's been some turnover in the band, and increasing levels of sophistication in their lyrics and composition, and they told us some wonderful stories about early American history, Emily Dickinson, feral children, and the time Melora was in a threesome with a party that shall be named and an albino abominable snowman.


[Rasputina cover Heart's "Barracuda"]

The opening band were godawful, but [livejournal.com profile] monster_grrrl did an excellent imitation that was almost worth suffering through them.

And a last bit of music:

Phil Ochs: There But For Fortune

I have such good friends. I hadn't even heard that there was a new movie about Phil Ochs, but [livejournal.com profile] bcholmes and C. contacted me almost simultaneously to make sure I knew about it.



It's very good. It's of the talking-heads-and-old-footage school of documentary filmmaking, but you don't really mind because the talking heads are interesting and the old footage included a great deal I hadn't seen. (Did you know that there was a music video for "No More Songs"? I didn't even know that they made music videos back then.) The interviews ranged from those you'd expect (Billy Bragg, Michael and Sonny Ochs) to rather surprising (pre-sellout Christopher Hitchens what? Taking the same stance on the Dylan-Ochs rivalry that I do? Say it ain't so!).

There's a certain amount of hard-to-take historical inevitability. Oh, Phil Ochs went to Chile, you say? And became friends with Victor Jara? This ends about as well as you'd expect.

The thing about Phil Ochs is that a movie about him isn't just a nostalgic look at a time when musicians were actually involved with the protest movement. It's kind of depressing how current his songs are, when I read about what's going on in Wisconsin or Bahrain or Libya.

Image and video hosting by TinyPic
[Also, he seriously had a sense of style, which is rare in a folksinger.]
sabotabby: raccoon anarchy symbol (fuck patriarchy)
Listening to CBC's Sunday Edition on the lack of female writers in magazine publishing. All of the women they're interviewing have interesting and relevant things to say on the subject. For some reason, they felt the need to interview John Macfarlane, editor of the Walrus, who has nothing interesting to say, beyond reminding me of why I never read the Walrus.

For example, he says that when one assigns articles, one wants to be gender-blind (what?) but sometimes it is just more appropriate to assign a certain gender. Like you wouldn't assign a man to write about parenting (double-what?).

I can't believe, in 2011, there are people who say this shit. Though I think this has a lot to do with why the magazine publishing industry is dead in the water and I only read blogs now.
sabotabby: raccoon anarchy symbol (fuck patriarchy)
I tried to take notice of the Penny Arcade thing, but the controversy failed to arouse my passion sufficiently because I never actually found that comic entertaining in the first place. I think I'm just not That Kind of Geek.

This said, I hate neckbeards and rape apologists is cool and deserves a signal boost.

I still don't get Tumblr, though.
sabotabby: raccoon anarchy symbol (fuck patriarchy)
The 6 (Wrong) Questions Men Love to Ask About Women. The last two particularly made me go "yes yes yes!"

For a site largely about superheroes, boobs, video games, and rampaging animals, they do seem to have a lot of feminist writing.
sabotabby: raccoon anarchy symbol (fuck patriarchy)
Show us your tits, writ large.

Memo to all concerned: My boobs do not cause earthquakes. Nor are they for your viewing pleasure. They are just boobs. Rather nice ones, but none of anyone's fucking business.

I was about to say: "Where is Twisty Faster when you need her?" But fortunately she's right here, because this whole thing is making me itchy in my second-wave feminist place.
sabotabby: raccoon anarchy symbol (Default)
Show us your tits, writ large.

Memo to all concerned: My boobs do not cause earthquakes. Nor are they for your viewing pleasure. They are just boobs. Rather nice ones, but none of anyone's fucking business.

I was about to say: "Where is Twisty Faster when you need her?" But fortunately she's right here, because this whole thing is making me itchy in my second-wave feminist place.
sabotabby: raccoon anarchy symbol (silver mt zion)
The following is coloured, of course, by my own musical tastes and latent Canadian patriotism.

I was nodding along to this until she mentioned post-rock as an example of "dude music." Because Sophie Trudeau is definitely the noodlingest member of Godspeed You! Black Emperor/Silver Mt. Zion (as well she should be; as far as I can tell, she's the most musically talented one in the band) and on a macro level, their music reverses the polarity of chick singer/male musicians.

I also don't like the implication that dudely music is an exploration of form over content (i.e., wanking on guitar and singing about nothing important), while lady music is the reverse. I don't like wank for the sake of wank, but one of the things I love about post-rock is that it's really both. The lyrics are absolutely all about the oppressed, while the music is unpredictable and multifaceted.

Anecdotal evidence:




This is not "music that has nothing to offer people who are disenfranchised or oppressed, because it either is totally uninterested in their disenfranchisement/oppression, or actively profits from it," and, video-aside, if you listen to it rather than watch the video, the three female musicians are the ones in the foreground. Also, they're doing something interesting, unlike most, uh, socially conscious music.*

Anyway, I think the phenomenon Silvana talks about is definitely a real thing. It's just that one's taste in music is so highly subjective (at least when we're talking about popular music) that it's nearly impossible to map onto politics. Even if "he has a shit-ton of records, but none are by women" is a pretty good indication that a dude has Issues With Women.

(For the record, I snerked at the mention of Pavement, because for utterly personal reasons, Pavement will always read as a dudely band for me. Also, I have a slight preference for female voices over male, which widens to a huge preference when it comes to, say, opera.)

All this is to ask: Am I the only 30-something feminist who doesn't see what the big deal about Sleater-Kinney is?


* Not that I always need something interesting going on in my music. I'm fine with breathtakingly poetic lyrics and music that just sounds good, or vice versa. But when it's both, I do get really excited. When it's neither, no amount of political solidarity will keep me from mocking it.
sabotabby: raccoon anarchy symbol (Default)
The following is coloured, of course, by my own musical tastes and latent Canadian patriotism.

I was nodding along to this until she mentioned post-rock as an example of "dude music." Because Sophie Trudeau is definitely the noodlingest member of Godspeed You! Black Emperor/Silver Mt. Zion (as well she should be; as far as I can tell, she's the most musically talented one in the band) and on a macro level, their music reverses the polarity of chick singer/male musicians.

I also don't like the implication that dudely music is an exploration of form over content (i.e., wanking on guitar and singing about nothing important), while lady music is the reverse. I don't like wank for the sake of wank, but one of the things I love about post-rock is that it's really both. The lyrics are absolutely all about the oppressed, while the music is unpredictable and multifaceted.

Anecdotal evidence:




This is not "music that has nothing to offer people who are disenfranchised or oppressed, because it either is totally uninterested in their disenfranchisement/oppression, or actively profits from it," and, video-aside, if you listen to it rather than watch the video, the three female musicians are the ones in the foreground. Also, they're doing something interesting, unlike most, uh, socially conscious music.*

Anyway, I think the phenomenon Silvana talks about is definitely a real thing. It's just that one's taste in music is so highly subjective (at least when we're talking about popular music) that it's nearly impossible to map onto politics. Even if "he has a shit-ton of records, but none are by women" is a pretty good indication that a dude has Issues With Women.

(For the record, I snerked at the mention of Pavement, because for utterly personal reasons, Pavement will always read as a dudely band for me. Also, I have a slight preference for female voices over male, which widens to a huge preference when it comes to, say, opera.)

All this is to ask: Am I the only 30-something feminist who doesn't see what the big deal about Sleater-Kinney is?


* Not that I always need something interesting going on in my music. I'm fine with breathtakingly poetic lyrics and music that just sounds good, or vice versa. But when it's both, I do get really excited. When it's neither, no amount of political solidarity will keep me from mocking it.

Profile

sabotabby: raccoon anarchy symbol (Default)
sabotabby

August 2017

S M T W T F S
  12345
67891011 12
1314 1516171819
20212223242526
2728293031  

Style Credit

Syndicate

RSS Atom
Page generated Aug. 20th, 2017 02:01 am
Powered by Dreamwidth Studios

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags

Most Popular Tags